Annual report pursuant to Section 13 and 15(d)

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

v3.19.1
Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2018
Accounting Policies [Abstract]  
Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

Note 2 — Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

 

Basis of Presentation

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its wholly-owned and majority-owned subsidiaries. All intercompany transactions and balances have been eliminated in consolidation. The Company holds a majority ownership interest and has a controlling financial interest in Lucid Diagnostics Inc., with the corresponding noncontrolling interest included as a separate component of consolidated stockholders’ equity, including the recognition in the consolidated statement of operations of the net loss attributable to the noncontrolling interest based on the respective ownership interest in Lucid Diagnostics Inc. See Note 14, Stockholders’ Equity and Common Stock Purchase Warrants, for a discussion of the Company’s majority-owned subsidiary Lucid Diagnostics Inc. and the corresponding noncontrolling interest. Certain items have been reclassified to conform to the current period presentation.

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires management to make accounting estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of expenses during the reporting period. Significant estimates in these consolidated financial statements include those related to the fair value of each of: debt obligations, common stock purchase warrants, and derivative liabilities, and stock-based compensation. Additional significant estimates includer research and development expenses, the provision or benefit for income taxes and the corresponding valuation allowance on deferred tax assets. In addition, management’s assessment of the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern involves the estimation of the amount and timing of future cash inflows and outflows. On an ongoing basis, the Company evaluates its estimates, judgements, and methodologies. The Company bases its estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions believed to be reasonable. Due to the inherent uncertainty involved in making such judgements, assumptions, and accounting estimates, the actual financial statement results could differ materially from such accounting estimates and assumptions.

 

JOBS Act Accounting Election

 

The Company is an “emerging growth company” or “EGC”, as defined in the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012 (the “JOBS Act”). Under the JOBS Act, an EGC can delay adopting new or revised accounting standards issued subsequent to the enactment of the JOBS Act until such time as those standards apply to private companies. The Company has irrevocably elected to avail itself of this exemption from new or revised accounting standards, and, therefore, will not be subject to the same new or revised accounting standards as public companies who are not an EGC.

 

Segment Data

 

The Company manages its operations as a single operating segment for the purposes of assessing performance and making operating decisions. No revenue has been generated since inception, and all tangible assets are held in the United States.

 

Going Concern

 

The provisions of Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) Topic 205-40, Presentation of Financial Statements - Going Concern (ASC 205-40) requires management to assess an entity’s ability to continue as a going concern within one year of the date of the financial statements are issued. In each reporting period, including interim periods, an entity is required to assess conditions known and reasonably knowable as of the financial statement issuance date to determine whether it is probable an entity will not meet its financial obligations within one year from the financial statement issuance date. Substantial doubt about an entity’s ability to continue as a going concern exists when conditions and events, considered in the aggregate, indicate it is probable the entity will be unable to meet its financial obligations as they become due within one year after the date the financial statements are issued.

 

The Company is an early stage and emerging growth company and is subject-to the corresponding risk of such companies. Since inception the Company has not generated any revenues and has incurred losses and negative cash flows from operating activities. The Company does not expect to generate positive cash flows from operating activities in the near future until it completes the development process and regulatory approvals of its products, and thereafter begins to commercialize and achieve substantial marketplace acceptance for its products.

 

The Company incurred a net loss attributable to PAVmed Inc. common stockholders of approximately $18.8 million and net cash flows used in operating activities of approximately $8.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2018. As of December 31, 2018, the Company had an accumulated deficit of approximately $37.0 million and negative working capital of approximately $2.5 million, with such working capital inclusive of approximately $7.9 million of the Senior Secured Convertible Note classified as a current liability and approximately $8.2 million of cash.

 

The Company anticipates incurring operating losses and does not expect to experience positive cash flows from operating activities and may continue to incur operating losses for the next several years as it completes the development of its products, seeks regulatory approvals and clearances of such products, and begin to commercially market such products. These factors, which have existed since inception, are expected to continue, and raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern within one year after the date the accompanying consolidated financial statements are issued.

 

The Company’s ability to fund its operations is dependent upon management’s plans, which include raising additional capital, refinance the debt upon maturity, obtaining regulatory approvals for its products currently under development, commercializing and generating revenues from products currently under development, and continuing to control expenses. However, there is no assurance the Company will be successful in these efforts.

 

A failure to raise sufficient capital, refinance the debt upon maturity, obtain regulatory approvals and clearances for the Company’s products, generate sufficient product revenues, or control expenditures, among other factors, will adversely impact the Company’s ability to meet its financial obligations as they become due and payable and to achieve its intended business objectives, and therefore, raises substantial doubt of the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern within one year after the date the consolidated financial statements are issued.

 

The Company’s consolidated financial statements have been prepared on a going concern basis which contemplates the realization of assets and satisfaction of liabilities and commitments in the normal course of business. The consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments relating to the recoverability and classification of recorded asset amounts or the amounts and classification of liabilities should the Company be unable to continue as a going concern.

 

Cash

 

The Company maintains its cash at a major financial institution with high credit quality. At times, the balance of its cash deposits may exceed federally insured limits. The Company has not experienced and does not anticipate any losses on deposits with commercial banks and financial institutions which exceed federally insured limits.

 

Equipment

 

Equipment is stated at cost, less accumulated depreciation. Depreciation is computed using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the respective assets. Maintenance and repairs are charged to operations as incurred. Upon sale or retirement of assets, the cost and related accumulated depreciation are removed from the balance sheet and resulting gain or loss, if any, is included in the consolidated statement of operations. The useful lives of equipment are as follows:

 

Research and development equipment   5 years
Computer equipment   3 years

 

Long-Lived Assets

 

The Company evaluates its long-lived assets, including equipment, for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate the carrying value of these assets may not be recoverable. Recoverability of these assets is measured by comparison of the carrying amount of each asset to the future undiscounted cash flows expected to result from the use of the asset and its eventual disposition. If the asset is considered impaired, the amount of any impairment is measured as the difference between the carrying value and the fair value of the impaired assets. The Company has not recorded impairment of any long-lived assets in the periods presented.

 

Offering Costs

 

Offering costs consist of certain legal, accounting, and other advisory fees incurred related to the Company’s efforts to raise debt and equity capital. Offering costs in connection with equity financing are recognized as either an offset against the financing proceeds to extent the underlying security is equity classified or a current period expense to extent the underlying security is liability classified or for which the fair value option is elected. Except for debt for which the fair value option is elected, offering costs, lender fees, and warrants issued in connection with debt financing are recognized as debt discount, which reduces the reported carrying value of the debt, and amortized as interest expense, generally over the contractual term of the debt agreement, to result in a constant rate of interest. Offering costs associated with in-process capital financing are accounted for as deferred offering costs.

 

Research and Development Expenses

 

Research and development expenses are recognized as incurred and include the salary and stock-based compensation of employees engaged in product research and development activities, and the costs related to the Company’s various contract research service providers, suppliers, engineering studies, supplies, and outsourced testing and consulting, as well as rental costs for equipment and access to certain facilities of contract research service providers.

 

Patent Costs and Purchased Patent License Rights

 

Patent related costs in connection with filing and prosecuting patent applications and patents filed by the Company are expensed as incurred and are included in the line item captioned “general and administrative expenses” in the accompanying consolidated statements of operations. Patent fee reimbursement expense incurred under the patent license agreement agreements are included in the line item captioned “research and development expenses” in the accompanying consolidated statements of operations. The purchase of patent license rights for use in research and development activities, including product development, are expensed as incurred and are classified as research and development expense.

 

Stock-Based Compensation

 

Stock-based awards are made to employees, members of its board of directors, and non-employees, under each of the PAVmed Inc. 2014 Long-Term Incentive Equity Plan and the Lucid Diagnostics Inc. 2018 Long-Term Incentive Equity Plan. Stock-based awards to employees and members of the Company’s board of directors are accounted for in accordance with FASB ASC Topic 718, Stock Compensation, (“ASC 718”) and stock-based awards to non-employees are accounted for in accordance with FASB ASC Topic 505-50, Equity-Based Payments to Non-Employees (“ASC 505-50”). See herein below for a discussion of “ASU 2018-07” with respect to ASC 505-50 non-employee stock-based compensation.

 

The Company measures the compensation expense of stock-based awards granted to employees and members of its board of directors using the grant-date fair value of the award and recognizes compensation expense for stock-based awards on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period, which is generally the vesting period of the respective stock-based award.

 

The Company measures the expense of stock-based awards granted to non-employees on a vesting date basis, fixing the fair value of vested non-employee stock options as of their respective vesting date. The fair value of vested non-employee stock options is not subject-to-change at subsequent reporting dates. The estimated fair value of the unvested non-employee stock options is remeasured to then current fair value at each subsequent reporting date. The expense of non-employee stock options is recognized on a straight-line basis over the service period, which is generally the vesting period of the respective non-employee stock-based award.

 

On June 20, 2018, the FASB issued its Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) 2018-07, Compensation—Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Improvements to Nonemployee Share-Based Payment Accounting” (“ASU 2018-07), which, upon the effective date, will result in non-employee stock-based compensation to be within the scope of ASC-718, and will supersede ASC 505-50. A principal change of the new guidance is to eliminate the ASC 505-50 required periodic fair value remeasure (“mark-to-market”) and use of the “contractual term” as an input to the Black-Scholes option pricing model to calculate the estimated fair value of stock options issued to non-employees, in favor of the ASC 718 one-time measurement of the grant date fair value and use of an “expected term” as such valuation input, for non-employee stock-based compensation expense, as is currently done for employee stock-based compensation expense.

 

The amended ASC-718 non-employee stock-based compensation provisions are effective for public companies for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within such fiscal year, and for all other companies for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, and interim periods within fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020. Early adoption is permitted, but no earlier than a company’s adoption of ASC Topic 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (“ASC 606). With respect to the Company and its majority-owned subsidiary, the amended ASC-718 non-employee stock-based compensation provisions are required to be adopted by no later than January 1, 2020, resulting from the Company’s “JOBS Act EGC Election” as discussed herein above. Additionally, the Company, under its “JOBS Act EGC Election”, is required to adopt ASC 606 by no later than January 1, 2019, which is the current required adoption date of ASC 606 for private companies. As such, at this time, the Company and its majority-owned subsidiary continue to apply the guidance of ASC-505-50 with respect to non-employee stock-based compensation, subject-to the future adoption date(s) of ASC-606 and the ASU 2018-07 amended ASC 718.

 

Financial Instruments Fair Value Measurements

 

The Company evaluates its financial instruments to determine if those instruments or any embedded components of those instruments potentially qualify as derivatives required to be separately accounted for in accordance with FASB ASC Topic 815, Derivatives and Hedging (ASC 815). The accounting for warrants issued to purchase shares of common stock of the Company is based on the specific terms of the respective warrant agreement, and are generally classified as equity, but may be classified as a derivative liability if the warrant agreement provides required or potential full or partial cash settlement. A warrant classified as a derivative liability, or a bifurcated embedded conversion or settlement option classified as a derivative liability, is initially measured at its issue-date fair value, with such fair value subsequently adjusted at each reporting period, with the resulting fair value adjustment recognized as other income or expense. If upon the occurrence of an event resulting in the derivate liability being subsequently classified as equity or otherwise derecognized, the fair value of the derivative liability will be adjusted on such date-of-occurrence, with such date-of-occurrence fair value adjustment recognized as other income or expense, and then the derivative liability will be derecognized at such date-of-occurrence fair value.

 

FASB ASC Topic 820, Fair Value Measurement, (ASC 820) defines fair value as the price which would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at a transaction measurement date. The ASC 820 three-tier fair value hierarchy prioritizes the inputs used in the valuation methodologies, as follows:

 

  Level 1 Valuations based on quoted prices for identical assets and liabilities in active markets.
     
  Level 2 Valuations based on observable inputs other than quoted prices included in Level 1, such as quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities in active markets, quoted prices for identical or similar assets and liabilities in markets which are not active, or other inputs observable or can be corroborated by observable market data.
     
  Level 3 Valuations based on unobservable inputs reflecting the Company’s own assumptions, consistent with reasonably available assumptions made by other market participants. These valuations require significant judgment.

 

As of December 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017, the carrying values of cash, accounts payable, and accrued expenses, approximate their respective fair value due to the short-term nature of these financial instruments.

 

The Company evaluates its financial instruments to determine if those instruments or any potential embedded components of those instruments qualify as derivatives required to be separately accounted for in accordance with FASB ASC Topic 815, Derivatives and Hedging (ASC 815). Warrants are classified as either equity or a derivative liability depending on the specific terms of the respective warrant agreement. The Series A Warrants are accounted for as a derivative liability, as such warrants have an exercise price adjustment provision. Warrants containing a cash settlement provision are accounted for as a derivative liability. A warrant classified as a liability, or a bifurcated embedded derivative classified as a liability, is initially measured at its issue-date fair value, with such fair value subsequently adjusted at each reporting period, with the resulting adjustment recognized as other income or expense. If upon the occurrence of an event resulting in the warrant liability or the embedded derivative liability being subsequently classified as equity, the fair value will be adjusted on such date-of-occurrence, with such date-of-occurrence fair value adjustment recognized as other income or expense, and then it will be classified as equity at such date-of-occurrence adjusted fair value.

 

The Company accounts for the issued and outstanding Senior Secured Convertible Note under the “FVO election” of ASC 825, Financial Instruments, as discussed below. The Senior Secured Convertible Note is principally a debt financial instrument host containing embedded features and /or options which would otherwise be required to be bifurcated from the debt host and recognized as separate derivative liabilities subject to initial and subsequent periodic estimated fair value measurements under ASC 815. Notwithstanding, ASC ASC 825-10-15-4 provides for the “fair value option (“FVO”), to the extent not otherwise prohibited by ASC 825-10-15-5, to be afforded to financial instruments, wherein the financial instrument is initially measured at its issue-date estimated fair value and subsequently remeasured at estimated fair value on a recurring basis at each reporting period date. Further, the estimated fair value adjustment, as required by ASC 825-10-45-5, is recognized as a component of other comprehensive income (“OCI”) with respect to the portion of the fair value adjustment attributed to a change in the instrument-specific credit risk, with the remaining amount of the fair value adjustment recognized as other income (expense) in the consolidated statement of operations. With respect to the Company, the “other income (expense) component” of the Senior Convertible Note fair value adjustment is presented in a single line in the consolidated statement of operations, as provided for by ASC 825-10-50-30(b). See Note 11, Financial Instruments Fair Value Measurements, and Note 12, Debt, for a further discussion of such FVO election and the Senior Secured Convertible Debt.

 

Income Taxes

 

The Company accounts for income taxes using the asset and liability method, as required by FASB ASC Topic 740, Income Taxes, (ASC 740). Current tax liabilities or receivables are recognized for the amount of taxes estimated to be payable or refundable for the current year. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for estimated future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax basis, along with net operating loss and tax credit carryforwards. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. See Note 6, Income Taxes, for a discussion of the “Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017”, enacted on December 22, 2017, which resulted in a change to future years’ statutory federal corporate tax rate applicable to taxable income. Changes in deferred tax assets and liabilities are recorded in the provision for income taxes.

 

Under ASC 740, a “more-likely-than-not” criterion is applied when assessing the estimated realization of deferred tax assets through their utilization to reduce future taxable income, or with respect to a deferred tax asset for tax credit carryforward, to reduce future tax expense. A valuation allowance is established, when necessary, to reduce deferred tax assets, net of deferred tax liabilities, when the assessment indicates it is more-likely-than-not, the full or partial amount of the net deferred tax asset will not be realized. As a result of the evaluation of the positive and negative evidence bearing upon the estimated realizability of net deferred tax assets, and based on a history of operating losses, it is more-likely-than-not the deferred tax assets will not be realized, and therefore a valuation allowance reserve equal to the full amount of the deferred tax assets, net of deferred tax liabilities, has been recognized as a charge to income tax expense as of December 31, 2018 and December 31, 2017.

 

The Company recognizes the benefit of an uncertain tax position it has taken or expects to take on its income tax return if such a position is more-likely-than-not to be sustained upon examination by the taxing authorities, with the tax benefit recognized being the largest amount having a greater than 50% likelihood of being realized upon ultimate settlement. As of December 30, 2018 the Company does not have any unrecognized tax benefits resulting from uncertain tax positions.

 

The Company’s policy is to record interest and penalties related to income taxes as part of its income tax provision. There were no amounts accrued for penalties or interest as of December 30, 2018 and December 31, 2017 or recognized during the three or nine months ended September 30, 2018 and 2017. The Company is not aware of any issues under review to potentially result in significant payments, accruals, or material deviations from its position.

 

Net Loss Per Share

 

The net loss per share is computed by dividing each of the respective net loss by the number of “basic weighted average common shares outstanding” and diluted weighted average shares outstanding” for the reporting period indicated. The basic weighted-average shares common shares outstanding are computed on a weighted average based on the number of days the shares of common stock of the Company are issued and outstanding during the respective reporting period indicated. The diluted weighted average common shares outstanding are the sum of the basic weighted-average common shares outstanding plus the number of common stock equivalents’ incremental shares on an if-converted basis, computed using the treasury stock method, computed on a weighted average based on the number of days potentially issued and outstanding during the period indicated, if dilutive. The Company’s common stock equivalents include: stock options, unit purchase options, convertible preferred stock, and common stock purchase warrants.

 

Notwithstanding, as the Company has a net loss for each reporting period presented, each of the basic and diluted net loss per share for each period presented is computed using only the basic weighted average common shares outstanding for each respective reporting period, as the inclusion of common stock equivalents incremental shares would be anti-dilutive.

 

Accordingly, as presented in the accompanying consolidated statement of operations, basic weighted average common shares outstanding are used to compute the basic and diluted net loss per share attributable to PAVmed Inc. and the basic and diluted net loss per share attributable to PAVmed Inc. common stockholders, for each reporting period presented.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-13, Fair Value Measurement (Topic 820): Disclosure Framework—Changes to the Disclosure Requirements for Fair Value Measurement, which modifies the disclosure requirements on fair value measurement. The guidance is effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2019 and interim periods within those annual periods, and early adoption is permitted. The Company is currently evaluating the impact the standard will have on its consolidated financial

statements.

 

In July 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-11, Earnings Per Share (Topic 260), Distinguishing Liabilities from Equity (Topic 480), Derivatives and Hedging (Topic 815) - Part I - Accounting for Certain Financial Instruments with Down-Round Features, and Part II - Replacement of the Indefinite Deferral for Mandatorily Redeemable Financial Instruments of Certain Nonpublic Entities and Certain Mandatorily Redeemable Noncontrolling Interests with a Scope Exception. Principally, ASU 2017-11 amendments simplify the accounting for certain financial instruments with down-round features. The amendments require companies to disregard the down-round feature when assessing whether the instrument is indexed to its own stock, for purposes of determining liability or equity classification. Companies that provide earnings per share (EPS) data will adjust their basic EPS calculation for the effect of the down-round feature when triggered (i.e., when the exercise price of the related equity-linked financial instrument is adjusted downward because of the down-round feature) and will also recognize the effect of the trigger within equity. Additionally, ASU 2017-11 also addresses “navigational concerns” within the FASB ASC related to an indefinite deferral available to private companies with mandatorily redeemable financial instruments and certain noncontrolling interests, which has resulted in the existence of significant “pending content” in the ASC. The FASB decided to reclassify the indefinite deferral as a scope exception, which does not have an accounting effect. The guidance of ASU 2017-11 is effective for public business entities, as defined in the ASC Master Glossary, for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within those fiscal years, and for all other entities, the amendments are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, and interim periods within fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020. Earlier adoption is permitted for all entities as of the beginning of an interim period for which financial statements (interim or annual) have not been issued or have not been made available for issuance. The Company is evaluating the impact of this guidance on its consolidated financial statements.

 

In May 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-09, Compensation-Stock Compensation (Topic 718) - Scope of Modification Accounting. In ASU 2017-09, the FASB provides guidance on determining which changes to the terms and conditions of stock-based compensation arrangements require the application of “modification accounting” under ASC 718. Generally, ASC 718 modification accounting is not applicable if the stock-based arrangement immediately before and after the modification has the same fair value, vesting conditions, and balance sheet classification. The guidance of ASU 2017-09 is effective for all entities for annual periods, and interim periods within those annual periods, beginning after December 15, 2017. Early adoption is permitted, including adoption in any interim period, for public business entities, as defined in the ASC Master Glossary, for periods for which financial statements have not yet been issued, and for all other entities for reporting periods for which financial statements have not yet been made available for issuance. The Company adopted this guidance as of April 1, 2017, and it did not have an effect on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-01, Business Combinations (Topic 805): Clarifying the Definition of a Business, which amends the guidance of FASB ASC Topic 805, Business Combinations (ASC 805) adding guidance to assist entities with evaluating whether transactions should be accounted for as acquisitions (disposals) of assets or businesses. The objective of ASU 2017-01 is to narrow the definition of what qualifies as a business under Topic 805 and to provide guidance for streamlining the analysis required to assess whether a transaction involves the acquisition (disposal) of a business. ASU 2017-01 provides a screen to assess when a set of assets and processes do not qualify as a business under Topic 805, reducing the number of transactions required to be considered as possible business acquisitions. ASU 2017-01 also narrows the definition of output under Topic 805 to make it consistent with the description of outputs under Topic 606. The guidance of ASU 2017-01 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods within those fiscal years and early adoption is permitted under certain circumstances. The adoption of this guidance as of January 1, 2018 did not have an effect on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

In August 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-15, which amended the guidance of FASB ASC Topic 230, Statement of Cash Flows (ASC 230) on the classification of certain cash receipts and payments. The primary purpose of ASU 2016-15 is to reduce the diversity in practice which has resulted from a lack of consistent principles on this topic, including to add or clarify guidance on eight specific cash flow issues, including debt prepayment or debt extinguishment costs, settlement of zero-coupon debt instruments, contingent consideration payments made after a business combination, proceeds from the settlement of insurance claims, proceeds from the settlement of corporate-owned life insurance policies, distributions received from equity method investees, beneficial interests in securitization transactions, and separately identifiable cash flows and application of the predominance principle. The adoption of this guidance as of January 1, 2018 did not have an effect on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

In May 2014, the FASB issued ASU 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606) and subsequently issued additional updates amending the guidance contained in Topic 606 (ASC 606), thereby affecting the guidance contained in ASU 2014-09. ASU 2014-09 and the subsequent ASC 606 updates will supersede and replace nearly all existing U.S. GAAP revenue recognition guidance. The core principle of ASU 2014-09 is to recognize revenue when promised goods or services are transferred to customers in an amount equal to the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled for those goods and services. ASU 2014-09 defines a five step process to achieve this core principle, and in doing so, more judgment and estimates may be required within the revenue recognition process than are required under existing U.S. GAAP. The standard is effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods therein, using either of the following transition methods: (i) a full retrospective approach reflecting the application of the standard in each prior reporting period with the option to elect certain practical expedients, or (ii) a retrospective approach with the cumulative effect of initially adopting the standard recognized at the date of adoption (which includes additional footnote disclosures). To date, since its inception, the Company has not generated any revenue, as such, the provisions of ASC 606 have not impacted the Company’s consolidated results of operations or financial condition.

 

In March 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-08, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606): Principal versus Agent Considerations (“ASU 2016-08”). The amendments are intended to improve the operability and understandability of the implementation guidance on principal versus agent considerations by amending certain existing illustrative examples and adding additional illustrative examples to assist in the application of the guidance. The effective date and transition requirements for the amendments are the same as the effective date and transition requirements in Topic 606. The guidance is effective for the Company beginning January 1, 2018, although early adoption is permitted beginning January 1, 2017. To date, since its inception, the Company has not generated any revenue, as such, the provisions of ASC 606 have not impacted the Company’s consolidated results of operations or financial condition.

 

In April 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-10, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606): Identifying Performance Obligations and Licensing (“ASU 2016-10”). The amendments in ASU 2016-10 clarify the following two aspects of Topic 606: (a) identifying performance obligations; and (b) the licensing implementation guidance. The amendments do not change the core principle of the guidance in Topic 606. The effective date and transition requirements for the amendments are the same as the effective date and transition requirements in Topic 606. The guidance is effective for the Company beginning January 1, 2018, although early adoption is permitted beginning January 1, 2017. To date, since its inception, the Company has not generated any revenue, as such, the provisions of ASC 606 have not impacted the Company’s consolidated results of operations or financial condition.

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842) (“ASU 2016-02”), which establishes a right-of-use (“ROU”) model requiring a lessee to recognize a ROU asset and a lease liability for all leases with terms greater-than 12 months. Leases will be classified as either finance or operating, with classification affecting the pattern of expense recognition in the income statement. The new standard is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods with those fiscal years. A modified retrospective transition approach is required for leases existing at, or entered into after, the beginning of the earliest comparative period presented in the financial statements, with certain practical expedients available. The adoption of this guidance did not have a significant effect on the Company’s consolidated financial position, results of operations, and cash flows.